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20121205
20121213
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and getting that. >> it's a statement. >> let's talk about the fiscal cliff. also on the radar this morning, after president obama and house speaker john boehner both were tight-lipped how the negotiations went. the co-founder of the fix the debt campaign, he was asked about the chances of striking a deal to avoid the cliff. >> it's probably more like a 40% chance we'll actually get it done before the end of the year. probably 25% chance we'll get it done right after the end of the year. and then there's that horrible 35% chance that we'll still go over the cliff and have pure chaos. but i think the chances of getting it done now are better. i think that's what's key. >> be sure to tune in tomorrow for the fiscal cliff coverage live from washington. mission critical, rise above d.c., all day long. becky quick, jim cramer, maria bartiromo holding their feet to the fire about where they stand on the fiscal cliff and how they'll do their part to rise above partisan politics and reach a deal. now, there are some bowles comments. 40%, yeah, but the odds are much better. they're still 35% chance
. >>> meanwhile, back in washington, with just over three weeks left to make a deal on the fiscal cliff, both sides out with new statents today. and on the surface, they still sound far apart. president obama this morning saying he's going to insist on raising taxes on the wealthiest americans no matter what. >> if we're serious about reducing our deficit while still investing in things like education and research that are important to growing our economy, and if we're serious about protecting middle-class families, then we're also going to have to ask the wealthiest americans to pay higher tax rates. that's one principle i won't compromise on. >> meanwhile, on the other side of the aisle, republican senator marco rubio gave the weekly republican address today. part of his message? the tax rate should not go up on anyone including the top 2%. >> we must reform our complicated, uncertain, job-killing tax code by getting rid of unjustified loopholes. but our goal should be to generate new revenue by creating new taxpayers, not new taxes. >> joining me, author of "the escape artists: how obama's
this morning business time to speak, particularly during this time of tension, we're looking at the fiscal cliff, to really use a few minutes to pay a tribute to two wonderful, outstanding senators who will be leaving us at the end of this term that i have served with. wonderful women named senator olympia snowe of maine and senator kay bailey hutchison of texas. dear friends across the other side of the aisle but though they were on the other side of the aisle there was no great divide between us. we have known each other for many years. a -- a few words i'd like to say about my very dear friend, senator olympia snowe. i served with senator snowe both in the house of representatives and then in the united states senate. wow. what an outstanding senator and congressperson she has been. and i know we will continue to see senator snowe in some type of role in public service, because that's just the kind of person she is. she is deeply in her d.n.a. a public servant. senator snowe has served her state of maine and our nation so well. she's one of our most respected members of congress, known
:30 eastern. you can see the house live when they return here on c-span. in the meantime while fiscal cliff negotiations continue, we hosted a roundtable discussion about the debt talks and domestic program cuts on this morning's "washington journal." can host: isabel sawhim and james capretta. mr. capretta, let me begin with you. are these sequester cuts devastating? guest: they would be deep cuts. 80% cut across the board is a very significant one-time cut for any program to sustain in the immediate year period. so they're not a good idea. would it be the end of the world? no. host: what do you mean by that? guest: there would be a downsizing of a lot of services across the government in terms of domestic accounts. so there would be fewer services being provided. there would be reduce in federal employees. some grant programs would take a haircut of 5%, 10%. so there would be some downsizing of the services that are provided by the federal government. but the economy would go on and the government would go on and the public would still continue to get by and large serviced. host: can agen
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4